The tea party: Tea Party supporters celebrate in Capitol Hill

The tea parties in Washington are still raging, but the Democratic Party’s embrace of tea parties has been a boon to its political fortunes.

And tea party supporters have been energized by the party’s embrace.

The tea party has grown so popular that some of its advocates have been emboldened to publicly attack the GOP.

In the Senate, for example, the tea party’s Senate Majority PAC has called on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to resign.

Tea party lawmakers have been particularly aggressive in attacking McConnell, who has refused to publicly endorse any candidate for the GOP nomination for president.

In the House, House Democrats have been working hard to make the tea parties a focal point of the midterm elections, with House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi calling the GOP’s “dishonest” tactics and tactics for the midterm “tactical and tactical mismanagement of the crisis.”

In a statement, Pelosi called for “a comprehensive and effective response” to the crisis.

Democrats have also sought to push through a health care overhaul that has the support of most House Democrats, even if they have been criticized for some of the legislation’s provisions.

For example, Democrats in the House have already passed a version of the bill that includes a $1.2 trillion increase in the federal deficit over a decade.

Republicans have argued that it would have a negative effect on the health care market and have criticized Democrats for trying to make a partisan issue of the GOP legislation.

Democrats have countered that they have tried to craft a bipartisan bill that would make the system more efficient and would help the middle class.

But the Democrats’ popularity with tea party voters has made the party an attractive target for Republicans.

In the early days of the tea partier movement, some Republican leaders criticized tea party activists for being too “unpredictable.”

For example the late Republican congressman Mark Sanford of South Carolina said, “The tea partiers are just going to be a bunch of nutty, unhinged nutty little nutjobs that can’t handle the truth.”

But Tea Party activists say the party is just a bunch, wild people who don’t get along with conservatives.

For tea party-aligned groups, the GOP has long been seen as an extension of the white working class and the white evangelical Christians that make up the party base.

Many tea party Republicans say they view the GOP as a party of white working-class voters, who have been ignored in recent decades by Democrats.

While the tea-party movement is now part of the Democratic base, its adherents have been drawn to the GOP because they view their leader as a defender of the Republican Party.

The Tea Party’s popularity among Republicans has helped propel the GOP to victory in the midterm election.

Republicans have lost control of the House of Representatives in the past five midterm elections and lost control in all but one.

A study by the nonpartisan Congressional Research Service found that tea party support had increased from 14 percent in 2014 to 30 percent in 2018, a huge increase that helped propel President Donald Trump to the White House.