Why is the coffee potting soil so different from the trees?

A special soil test, called a soil analysis, is being conducted to determine how much soil is needed for coffee beans to grow.

The soil is being grown by a small number of farms, including one in Ohio.

But the soil is very different from a forested soil that typically grows in warm, humid regions.

Read more One of the most obvious differences is that soil is less acidic.

Soil samples from trees in the Ohio forest tested at the University of Ohio’s School of Agriculture and Life Sciences were also found to be less acidic than those from the soil of coffee growers.

It’s not the soil that is making the difference, said Dr. Steven Zimbalist, the research leader for the study.

The study was published this week in the journal Agriculture, Horticulture and Food Systems.

While the study shows that soil pH is important, the study doesn’t tell us what type of soil to use for coffee growing, Zimball said.

We do know, however, that the pH of soil can have a significant effect on the soil quality, Zombalist said.

The study showed that soil with a pH of 5.5 to 6.5 had lower yields, he said.

So it would seem that a pH in the 6.3 to 6, but not 6.8 range, is ideal.

For now, the researchers are trying to determine whether a soil pH of 6.6 or 6.9 will result in better yields for coffee trees.